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Packaging demand across the world reached US$917.1bn in 2019 and is expected to grow in the coming four years, according to the latest data from industry analyst Smithers. Consumption at current prices has increased from US$861bn in 2014 to US$891bn in 2018, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 0.9 percent. Analysis in its comprehensive […]

August 26, 2021

World packaging market to top US$1 trillion in 2024

Packaging demand across the world reached US$917.1bn in 2019 and is expected to grow in the coming four years, according to the latest data from industry analyst Smithers.

Consumption at current prices has increased from US$861bn in 2014 to US$891bn in 2018, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 0.9 percent. Analysis in its comprehensive study The Future of Global Packaging to 2024 forecast market expansion across 2019–24 at a 2.8 percent CAGR to reach US$1.05 trillion in 2024.

Asia is the largest market and accounted for 40.6 percent of world packaging consumption in 2018. North America is in second place with 22.6 percent of world packaging consumption, ahead of Western Europe with 20.3 percent.

Developing markets
The market will benefit from rising real incomes, growing population, rising urbanization and the further development of retail infrastructure in the emerging and developing nations of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Eastern Europe. This will see all of these region register packaging consumption grow faster than the world market average rate over the five-year period to 2024.

In contrast more mature markets – North America, Western Europe and Australasia – are forecast to see slower growth, placing a new emphasis on innovation and diversification for packaging suppliers.

China is the world’s largest packaging consumer with a consumption of US$207bn in 2018, ahead of the US on US$173bn, and Japan on US$48.5bn. Across the past five years, the fastest growth has come from India worth US$40.1bn in 2019, it has overtaken both France and Germany to become the fourth largest national market in the world.

Australia in context
Australia is the largest packaging market in Australasia and accounted for approximately 80.0 percent of sales in 2018. New Zealand is the second largest national market with almost 10 percent of sales. They are both mature packaging markets, with high packaging penetration.

In Australia, packaging sales at current prices grew during 2014–18 from $12.2bn (AUD) to $13.9bn, an annual average growth rate of 3.4 percent. In US dollar terms, packaging sales at current prices declined from US$11.0bn to US$10.4bn during the same period, an annual average fall of 1.3 percent.

A reversal of this downward trend is forecast. As the region enters the 2020s it will return to growth returning, at a modest rate of 1.3 percent. This will push the total value above US$14bn in 2024 for the first time.

Sustainability
Sustainability, recycling, over packaging and bans on single-use plastic packaging are key issues for suppliers in developed packaging markets, led by Western Europe. Growing consumer concern over the preservation of the environment is driving demand for more sustainable packaging, based on renewable resources. The ease with which packaging can be collected and recycled is growing in importance for packaging producers, brand owners and governments.

There is mounting public pressure, now being backed by legislation like the EU’s Single-use Plastics Directive, to limit the use of plastic formats. In response brand owners and retail chains are committing to phasing out non-recyclable and difficult to recycle multilayer flexible packaging materials in favor of more sustainable alternatives, such as paper and paperboard.

Material demands
Paperboard is the most used packaging material, accounting for around a third of world packaging markets consumption, followed by flexible packaging at 25.5 percent, rigid plastics at 18.7 percent and metal at 12.1 percent, glass packaging accounts for 5.8 percent and other packaging 4.7 percent.

Concern for the environment is benefiting the corrugated board market due to the perceived and real environmental benefits in using cellulose-based packaging. Lightweighting of board construction is reducing the rate of volume growth slightly, but the value is forecast to rise faster over the Smithers forecast period.

Online shopping will continue to challenge corrugated packaging designers in developing frustration-free packaging options. In conventional retail corrugated packaging companies are emphasizing shelf-ready packaging to reduce the workload for unpacking and displaying.

Despite environmental concerns, worldwide flexible plastic is set to grow at the fastest rate over 2019-2024, followed by rigid plastics and board. The retail sector’s growing demand for extended shelf life for the packaged products and consumer demand for convenience products are driving sales of barrier packaging films. Many different end-use sectors are adopting multilayer flexible packaging solutions, including metallized film. Retort foods and pharmaceuticals packaging are growing markets for PET-based transparent deposition films, while high-barrier films are used in case-ready and modified atmosphere packaging.

End-use applications
Industrial/transit is the largest packaging market and accounted for 43.3 percent of world packaging consumption in 2018. Corrugated boxes account for a large share of global transit packaging consumption, and this will strengthen over the next five years due to the wider use of e-commerce selling channels. In industrial shipping, there will be a rise in the use of intermediate bulk containers (IBCs), and to a lesser extent plastic and steel drums.

Food packaging accounted for 28.4 percent of packaging demand in 2018 but will see slightly slower growth moving forwards. Lifestyle factors are being felt in the food segment, with consumer demand for health and wellness products, urbanization and busier lifestyles, and the continuing rise in single-parent and single-person households. These create a growing demand for convenience products/packaging, more portable packaging for on-the-go consumption and smaller pack sizes.

In developing markets domestic supermarkets/hypermarkets are spreading to many major cities to take a growing share of food and drink consumption, displacing traditional local and independent markets. International retail chains are also expanding their presence in developing regions, bringing more consumers into contact with Western shopping and food consumption habits.

Healthcare packaging consumption is forecast to grow at the fastest rate, just ahead of cosmetics. This is driven by aging populations, and the resultant increase in demand for a wide range of drugs. There is also a growing health awareness among consumers, leading to higher demand for over-the-counter (OTC) medication, vitamins and dietary supplements.

The impact of evolution in demand and the future growth in the packaging market are analyzed critically in the Future of Global Packaging to 2024. This is quantified in a data set of unparalleled granularity, with over 700 data tables and figures, giving current and future growth outlooks for nearly fifty countries worldwide.

Source: Packaging News

Fierce competition for ocean freight capacity is affecting the rising costs of shipping. In fact, freight rates are expected to continue increasing as any new capacity is slow to come. New highs this year are expected and will remain above their pre-pandemic levels for the foreseeable future. Why? We saw a new surge in prices […]

August 26, 2021

Will Global Shipping Costs Continue to Rise?

Fierce competition for ocean freight capacity is affecting the rising costs of shipping. In fact, freight rates are expected to continue increasing as any new capacity is slow to come. New highs this year are expected and will remain above their pre-pandemic levels for the foreseeable future. Why?

We saw a new surge in prices across different freight rates (dry bulk, containers) along major trade routes in the first months of this year. Several trade lanes have tripled in price compared to last year, and similar rises have been seen in charter prices for container vessels.

Zero short-term relief

With little sign of relief in the short term, rates are likely to spike again in Q4, as rising demand will continue globally to match limited shipping capacity and the lockdown’s disruptive effects. If and when new capacity does arrive, it would still be in the best interests of container liners to maintain the high rates as a way of catching up on lower pandemic revenues.

With that in mind, there are other reasons why prices are unlikely to come down any time soon.

Continued global imbalances

Imbalances in the production and demand for goods, that had built up even pre-pandemic were exacerbated by different countries’ staggered locking down and opening up. This was compounded by shipping companies cutting capacity along major routes and empty containers stored on the wrong side of freight. While global demand for international trade in goods has recovered, opening economies seeking restocked inventories have intensified competition for ocean freight across several supply chains.

Few alternatives

It’s hard to avoid surging transport costs when alternative modes of transportation that would normally be an option, such as air or train aren’t an option either. The capacity for air freight has become prohibitively expensive as high-end products such as electronics have taken the lion’s share, with higher margins able to withstand the bloat. Shippers of lower value products such as clothes, toys, household items or promotional articles have experienced a 5% increase in freight costs.

Absorbing these costs into margins will see consumers feel the pinch both financially and with availability.

An unbalanced recovery

Many countries are exporting more goods than they did before even the pandemic, while in others output is lagging due to slower economic recovery. As trade in goods rises further between major trading countries the competition will continue to put more pressure on freight rates in the near term – with displaced empty containers clogging up ports around the world.

Port congestion and closures keep creating delays

Canceled port calls continue to cut 10% of scheduled capacity. There are signs of improvement but current plans will average at 4%. Cancellations have partly been a response to delays, so shipping capacity may continue to be taken out of the system at short notice while the system remained congested.

There are some signs that average performance will start to improve as the share of vessels reaching their destinations on time stopped sliding in April, and average delays improved. But overall performance remains the lowest it has been in ten years of records.

Share of vessels arriving on time

While the pandemic continues to cause major to disruptions and affect the price of freight, we will continue to seek out alternatives that bring the cost of transportation down. For smaller batch products, where possible, we will focus on air, train and road routes to mitigate the impact so higher shipping costs in the short and long term. Although China and other major trading countries are making progress with vaccination programs, creating immunity will take time and consequently handing interruptions will remain a risk over the coming months.

Flood of new container capacity will ease price pressures, but not before 2023

The pandemic has been a boon for container liners, who have enjoyed outstanding financial results over the first 5 months of 2021. Orders for new container vessels reached a record high of 229 ships with a total cargo capacity of 2.2 million TEU. When ready in 2023, the coming increase in ocean freight capacity will put downward pressure on shipping costs but won’t necessarily return freight rates to their pre-pandemic levels.

Thanks to Joanna Konings & Rico Luman for the background context.

Tawazon partner Sudarshan launches a New High Visibility Pigment.  Need a new look for your warehouse? Time to recoat your industrial piping? If sunny days are your cup of tea, we’ve got good news. For Tawazon’s industrial clients looking to make an impact in the market with their coated products or assets, Tawazon’s supplier/partner of […]

August 3, 2021

A BRIGHTER DAY FOR TAWAZON CLIENTS

Tawazon partner Sudarshan launches a New High Visibility Pigment. 

Need a new look for your warehouse? Time to recoat your industrial piping? If sunny days are your cup of tea, we’ve got good news. For Tawazon’s industrial clients looking to make an impact in the market with their coated products or assets, Tawazon’s supplier/partner of two decades, Sudarshan, has recently launched a stunning new pigment color to their Sudaperm™ range of pigments for coatings. This innovation is the start of a revolution in the chemical industry. Sudaperm™ Yellow 3030C is not just a new, unusual color, but it also comprises new chemistry of organic pigment. What makes the pigment so attractive is its bright color, with a base tinge of green that makes it really easy on the eye in direct sunlight. Sudaperm Yellow 3030C is a PY 138 for coatings applications that provide high light and heat resistance with good weather-fastness for it’s perfect for applications on objects that require high visibility in all weather conditions. Tawazon is the exclusive distribution partner for all Sudarshan products in the Middle East and East Africa, so if you see this color popping up to brighten the world around you, you can be sure they’re behind it.

Holland Colours – an independent Dutch manufacturer of colourants and additives for the plastics market will be collaborating with long-time partner Tawazon Chemicals. With a strong position in the PET packaging- as well as the building & construction market Holland Colours’ products are known for their low dosing levels, natural carriers and excellent characteristics for […]

May 29, 2021

Tawazon to distribute Holland Colours in South Africa

Holland Colours – an independent Dutch manufacturer of colourants and additives for the plastics market will be collaborating with long-time partner Tawazon Chemicals. With a strong position in the PET packaging- as well as the building & construction market Holland Colours’ products are known for their low dosing levels, natural carriers and excellent characteristics for recycling possibilities.

For the last 25 years Holland Colours has worked very successfully with Banbury as distributor in the South Africa to sell products in this market. From the 1st of August Holland Colours will work with Tawazon as new local distributor of all Holcobatch and Holcoprill colours and support in every possible way.

Tawazon has been in business with Holland Colours more than 25 years. Headquartered in Dubai the Tawazon partner office in South Africa is Eisotex in Durban. Technical assistance will be guaranteed by  Holland Colour team of experts that is working around the globe to help to optimise customers process.

Holland Colours is looking forward to be able meeting customers in South Africa as soon as travels are open. Please contact Holland Colours team if you would like to receive more information about technology, products, colouring costs-in-use and our logistic services.

Tawazon Chemical Company LLC

Suites 301/308, 3rd Floor, Al Khaleej Building,
Zabeel Street, Dubai
P.O.Box: 52161
Tel: +971 4 3368230
Fax: +971 4 3367357
Email: info@tawazon.ae

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